Browse by Categories
  Home
  Towns / Villages
  Accommodation
  Arts / Crafts
  Attractions
  Business Directory
  Classifieds
  Education
  Employment
  Entertainment
  Festivals
  Genealogy
  Heritage
  Industry
  Leisure Activities
  Links
  Maps
  News
  Photo Gallery
  Political
  Property
  Restaurants
  Shopping
  Sporting
  Tourism
  Travel
  Weather
  What’s on
Corrandulla - Annaghdown County Galway Ireland
Home Advertise Contact Us

Corrandulla / Annaghdown 
 
Accommodation  ~ Hotels  ~ B&B  ~ Self Catering  ~ Hostels  ~ Restaurants 
Property  ~  Business Listings  ~  Attractions  ~  Activities  ~  Maps
 
 
       
The village, meanders around scenic Annaghdown Bay and finish near the old passenger steamer quay, now used by pleasure and angling craft. A boat marina and childrens' swimming area are also provided beside the pier. Nearby, there is a marble memorial to the tragic drowning of twenty villagers on boat trip to Galway in 1828, recalled in the famous Anthony Raftery poem, Anah Cuain. Annaghdown is an ideal base to try your hand at trout or salmon angling or pike and porch angling in the lower section of Lough Corrib. It is also renowned for its varied collection of ecclesiastical ruins. No less a person than St. Brendan, the Navigator, is said to have founded a convent for his sister here. He died at Annaghdown in 577 and was buried in Clonfert. The more important sites among the ruins include a 12th century abbey and a cathedral with, perhaps, the finest transitional - type window, c. 1190, in the land. Nearby, an impressive 15/16th century tower house still stands overlooking the bay.
 

Annaghdown Cathedral County Galway Ireland

Annaghdown Castle County Galway Ireland

 
Annaghdown Cathedral
This priory (above left) was designed along military lines, as shown by these remaining fortifications. Annaghdown, situated on the shores of Lough Corrib, was once the site of a 12th century diocese, later abandoned by the Diocese of Tuam. St. Brendan of Clonfert is supposed to have died here in 577 A.D., having first founded a monastry. The archaeological remains of the village reflect its monastic history, and comprise holy wells (named after St. Brendan and St. Cormac) and ruins of a castle, the cathedral and Augustinian priory, another religious foundation.
    
Annaghdown Castle
Annaghdown Castle (above right) was erected on the east shore of Lough Corrib by the O'Flaherties in the late 14th century. 
 
Cregg Castle - Corrandulla County Galway Ireland Corrandulla Show County Galway Ireland
 
Cregg Castle - Corrandulla
Cregg Castle (above left) was built by the Kirwan family in 1648, and is said to be the last fortified mansion built west of the Shannon. This is still inhabited, and operates as an hotel. Built on the site of an 11th century castle, Cregg Castle has been a bed and breakfast since 1990. At one time, the castle's estate consisted of several thousand acres; it is now 165 acres.

Corrandulla Show
Corrandulla show is one of the highlights in the local calendar. It is held in June of each year. The show includes judging of several classes of horses, show jumping, dog show. There is also and arts & crafts section, plus a bonny baby competition
Many side shows & trade stands.

Anach Cuan
The marble memorial of the tragic drowning of twenty villagers on boat trip to Galway in 1828, recalled in famous Anthony Raftery poem, Anah Cuain. Annaghdown has a particularly tragic place in Irish history. Before the local roads were properly surfaced it was customary for the people of the vicinity to travel by boat to Galway to market; animals, poultry, people and produce travelled together in the boats. On one occasion such a boat took water - caused, it is said, by a sheep kicking through the rotten planking - and sank, with great loss of life. This event was the subject of a long ballad, 'Anach Cuan', familiar to many generations of schoolchildren, which recounts over a number of verses, the sad events.

"Lovely Annaghdown" is an expression often used to describe this important angling centre on Lough Corrib, some 13kms north of Galway City, about half way between the City and Headford (on the N84, turn at Clonboo). Annaghdown is an ideal base to try your hand at trout or salmon angling or pike and pirch angling in the lower section of Lough Corrib. A boat marina and childrens' swimming area are provided beside the pier, from which the view across the lake looks towards Oughterard and Connemara.

 

Annaghdown Pier Lough Corrib County Galway Ireland

 

 
Towns & Localities in County Galway

 Aran Islands | Athenry | Ballinasloe | Ballygar | Barna | Carna | Carraroe | Claregalway | Clarinbridge | Clifden | Clonbur | Corofin
Connemara | Corrandulla | Dunmore | Galway City | Glenamaddy | Gort | Headford | Kinvara | Leenane | Loughrea | Milltown | Monivea
 Mountbellew | Moycullen | Oranmore | Oughterard | Portumna | Renvyle | Salthill | Spiddal | Tuam | Turloughmore | Williamstown
 

home | towns | accommodation | B&B | hotels | self catering | arts | attractions | business | education | weddings
 wap | employment | entertainment | festivals | genealogy | heritage | industry | leisure | links | maps | news | gallery
 political | property | restaurants | shopping | sporting | tourism | travel | weather | what's on | advertise | contact

Website designed by Western-Webs, Tuam County Galway Ireland 

©2007 County Galway Guide, all rights reserved